HOW I BECAME AN ARTIST

I often get asked how I became an artist, so I thought I might share my story. In some ways I have always been an artist. As a child I was always drawing. I loved nothing more than spending hours creating elaborate patterns and playing with coloured pencils. I used to collect little pieces of coloured and brightly patterned paper so I could create crazy colourful collages. My love affair with coloured pencils, paints and beautiful paper has been a long and satisfying one.

 HOw I became an artist

HOw I became an artist

I became an artist later in life

So if being an artist is an approach or someone who creates because that is just what they do, then that is what I have always been. As a profession though, well that's a different story. I took a rather circuitous route to get here and it is perhaps all the sweeter for it.

As a child, I was always drawing. I loved spending hours creating elaborate and intricate patterns from my imagination. I used to get through so much paper that my dad started to buy me large rolls of wallpaper lining-paper to keep up with my insatiable demand for more paper.  I used to have a large box in which I collected shiny and patterned papers, from sweet wrappers, pages torn from magazines, bits of shiny wrapping paper. I loved my “special paper” box, I used to like tipping it on the floor and seeing how the different patterns and colours combined with each other. So, drawing and painting was something which came innately me as a child. But I only became a full-time artist later in life. I took a rather circuitous route to get here as a profession and it is perhaps all the sweeter for it.

 A Ten year old me...

A Ten year old me...

 

When I was 18 I gave up studying art and I can't really understand why. I do not really believe in regrets, but this lazy decision by my teenage self is one I have questioned many times over the years. I gave it up to concentrate on more academic subjects and blithely altered my career trajectory with little thought at all.

Art was a passion not my profession

I went off to study Journalism and then completed a postgraduate degree. And then for over 15 years I had a great full-on career, working with great people in PR agencies and charities with my art and creativity as something I did away from my day job. I went to art class, after art class to help satisfy my passion. I studied printing, textiles, ceramics, collage, drawing I then completed a three year part time Fine Art course which i found so stimulating and satisfying.   I thought that was enough. I was happy. I was successful in my job. I'd met and married a wonderful and inspiring man. Everything was just fine. Art was a passion not my profession.

A lightening bolt I could not ignore

Then in my 30's out of no-where a thought occurred to me that I couldn't ignore. A thought that would change my life and my career. It was early morning in winter and I was off to meet a client for an early breakfast meeting. As I waited for my train on the still dark platform, a voice in my head said "You’re on the wrong path and you need to be an artist.” It sounds bonkers, even to me now. No one thinks like that, in the third person. But that is how it happened, it was a bit like someone was talking to me. A weird yet absolutely wonderful lightening bolt. And that was it.

Taking action 

It was such an overwhelming sensation that I couldn’t ‘not’ do something. So I did do something. I changed-up my life. I handed in my notice at my company, where I had worked for a decade and hoped a path would become clear. I jumped without a safety net. I took action.

 

Becoming a professional artist 

And I started off on an amazing artistic-rollercoaster of a journey. I started painting and put some paintings online. I was astonished when I had sold one within a week. I found a  new job, that was two days a week rather than the six I was working before. It gave me space and time to create, explore, experiment and make art. It also meant my husband and I could move away from London and head for the seaside. And I kept taking small yet decisive actions which together created big life changes.  

 

 At The Saatchi Gallery London

At The Saatchi Gallery London

 Photo credit: Jim Holden

Photo credit: Jim Holden