HOW TO NOT 'GET IN THE WAY' OF YOUR OWN CREATIVITY

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Creative people are curious, flexible, and independent with a tremendous spirit and a love of play
— HENRI MATISSE

You are a creative powerhouse! I know that sometimes it may not feel like it, but I believe we are all innately creative with a massive amount of creative potential.

Sometimes we get in our own way and in the way of this potential.  I certainly have.  

Here is what I have learnt along the way about the creative process, or as I’m being snazzy today “Seven ways to develop your creative courage”. I hope it may resonate with you and your experiences.

helen wells art

1. LOVE THE PROCESS.

Whether it’s creative writing, or drawing, or making music, a big, important part of the joy of creating is the process itself or the ‘doing’. 

We often get hung up on the result, without remembering that the 'process' that got us there is just as valuable. 

I used to be a crazed perfectionist when it came to my art. So much so, that I let my negative judgement get in the way of my enjoyment of the activity. 

For many years in my 20s I didn’t draw anything at all, because I was so critical of what I did draw. I stopped making art entirely because I always thought the end results were, quite frankly rubbish.  I found it easier to not do it at all. I let my own criticism get in the way of something which I just loved to do so much. 

So, now I try to not be so attached to the outcome. Ralph Waldo Emerson said that “life is a journey, not a destination” and perhaps this also applies to our creative endeavours. If we can love the 'doing' and learn from the process, then the outcome isn’t EVERYTHING, it is just part of the magical mix! 

helen wells creativity

2. BE KIND NOT CRITICAL.

Apparently, our beautiful brains create up to 50,000 thoughts a day (that's quite creative) but unfortunately up to 80% of them are negative. Not so helpful when we are trying to ignite our fledgling flickers of creativity. Negative self-talk or chatter is just part of being a human and we can’t stop it. We can’t eliminate the “critical radio” that is broadcasting constantly in our head. I don't think trying to replace negative thoughts with positive ones works. What we can do, is remember that our thoughts are just thoughts. They are not necessarily true. 

 If we keep playing the same thought on repeat, it can be helpful to unpack it. I find it helpful to ask:

•    Is it true? 
•    Is it helpful? 
•    Is it kind?

Sometimes when we probe our self-critism in this way it can take the sting out of its tail.

I’m not saying that we shouldn’t assess or critique our creative output – but self criticism is only helpful when used as a positive tool, not a weapon.
 

Helen Wells abstract art

3. DON'T LET ANXIETY AND DOUBT STOP YOU CREATING.

Insecurity and anxiety about our abilty/skill level or artwork hinders our ability to create. I let it stop me in my tracks and it stopped me creating and drawing for years.  I’m sad that I let that happen, but I’m definitely making up for lost time now. 

creative courage HELEN WELLS

4. SPARE THE COMPARING.

Comparison is the thief of joy. Creativity is about being the glorious individual that you are, it’s about expressing yourself, it’s about allowing your song to be sung and embracing your own wonderful weirdness. 

Social media has made it so easy for us to compare ourselves, our lives, our creative output, our artwork with other people’s artwork. Or so we think… in my experience we tend to compare our very worst bits with someone else’s best bits. So don’t get side tracked by someone else’s journey, get focused on yours own.

creativity HELEN WELLS

 

5.  DEFINE YOUR OWN SUCCESS CRITERIA.

The wonderful thing is that we are all in charge of making up our own rules when it comes to defining our success criteria. Success is a personal thing and should be unique to us as individuals. For some, success may be being represented by a gallery and super 'rock and roll' famous, for others it may be showing a painting in a local cafe, for others it may be trying a new type or paint, or drawing in a sketchbook for the first time. Don't let other people dictate your success criteria, we are all different and have different motivations, so don't let someone else's definition of success be yours by default. 

creativty and kindness

6. FEEL LIKE AN IMPOSTER AND DO IT ANYWAY.

Impostor syndrome is definitely a thing.  It is the feeling that you're a fraud or that any day now you'll be exposed. Apparently it is, in part, due to being unable to internalise success, or take credit for your own achievements. When I started out as an artist, I thought every success was a fluke, every achievement was a happy accident. I still sometimes feel like this. When it happens I label it as "oh you're feeling that imposter thing again', acknowledge that I'm feeling it, do a mental run down of all my successes to remind myself I'm not really a massive fat fraud and I carry on regardless...

helen wells work in progress

7. BE PLAYFUL AND BIN PERFECTIONISM.

I once heard that there is no such word for creativity in the Tibetan language and that the nearest translation was ‘natural’. I like that. I like the idea that creativity is a natural and innate way of being. When you look at young kids you have to agree. They can turn an empty box into an amazing adventure...I think that having a playful approach to our own creative endeavours can be so helpful. If you're playing, you're not obsessed with perfection. When you are playing  you are free to mess about a bit, try things out, it removes barriers and restrictions. When you are playing there are no rules, just experimentation and joy. When you are playing there is a lightness and an innate curiosity. Playing is fun, perfectionism is not.. 

helen wells art